Notes on The Architect in Georgian Britain

The remit of the architect in the 18th century became all-encompassing. It was in this period that the role flourished in such a way that had been unrealised in preceding centuries. Indeed, considering the great names in architecture of the era, one would associate a fame: These men were not merely builders, but gentlemen of … Continue reading Notes on The Architect in Georgian Britain

The Victorian Country House: Morality, Domesticity & Organisation

Running a household in Victorian England had become a science – with tasks to be delegated and a system of categorised activity for those at every level of society. When Girouard writes of the eminent concern for ‘morality, domesticity, organisation and hospitality’[1] in the country house the emphasis is on the rigid upholding of standards … Continue reading The Victorian Country House: Morality, Domesticity & Organisation

The Omega Workshops Ltd. – 33 Fitzroy Square

Please note, if you hadn't already, it would be most beneficial to read my preceding articles on the Omega Workshops and their connection to Modernism and the Bloomsbury Group in Twentieth Century England... Part of 1 The Omega Workshops Ltd. – “The Big Idea” here... Part 2 of The Omega Workshops Ltd. – “Objects and … Continue reading The Omega Workshops Ltd. – 33 Fitzroy Square

The Elizabethan Country House And The Cult Of Sovereignty

From 1570 – 1620 one can chart the ‘Elizabethan building boom’[1]. Here, we see an unprecedented rise in the building of ‘proud, ambitious heaps’[2] and the beginnings of the ‘architect’ as an entity in the cultural, economic and social landscape. Architectural historian Sir John Summerson credits ‘the most daring of all English buildings’[3] as the … Continue reading The Elizabethan Country House And The Cult Of Sovereignty

Prince Albert: Patron & Collector – Supporting the Efforts of Artists and Innovators

Prince Albert proved himself to be an involved patron using his own expertise to foster artistic talent, his twin pursuits of Northern and Italian painting inclined the prince to encourage living artists. For example, Albert acquired paintings from contemporaries such as William Dobson, William Dyce, Charles Eastlake and Michael Wittmer1, whose work added to the vocabulary … Continue reading Prince Albert: Patron & Collector – Supporting the Efforts of Artists and Innovators

The Omega Workshops Ltd. – Objects and Interiors

In the introductory article, we went over the principles on which the Omega Workshops Ltd. were founded. I feel that the best way to trace development in the decorative arts is to explore how forming principles were practically applied. To that end, we’re going to use Bloomsbury and Omega styled interiors and objects as a … Continue reading The Omega Workshops Ltd. – Objects and Interiors

The Omega Workshops Ltd. – The Big Idea

Perhaps you saw the televised adaption Life in Squares or perhaps you encountered one of its members through the literary and artistic channels of early 20th century Bohemianism: The infamous Bloomsbury Group were a collective of artists, philosophers, writers and intellectuals active at the exciting time of early British Modernism (by which I refer to … Continue reading The Omega Workshops Ltd. – The Big Idea

Musings: The Concept of “Femininity” and the Rococo Style

With the rococo, given the social climate contemporary to that time in history, you cannot help but notice that the scenes and embellishments demonstrate the nuances of taste, decoration and aesthetic influenced and informed by women. It was the Earl of Shaftesbury who, in, 1713 denounced the Rococo style as “a revolting form exalting Sensation … Continue reading Musings: The Concept of “Femininity” and the Rococo Style