Musings: Angela Carter & The Bloody Chamber

The Bloody Chamber: Blood. Using blood as the starting point, my initial thoughts are on Carter’s title, its allusions and its uses in a wider feminist discussion. A woman’s fertility and her sexuality come down to blood: Hot-blooded, intimacy, rituals, cults and covens, blood bonds; there’s a mysticism surrounding blood and its potency. Feminist artists … Continue reading Musings: Angela Carter & The Bloody Chamber

Shakespearean Drama: Analysis of William Shakespeare’s Richard III, Act I Scene 2

Richard III stands as a historical play in the Shakespearean canon: Playwright William Shakespeare (1564-1616) worked this particular episode circa 1592 in a saga pertaining to the ‘Tudor Myth’[1]. Belonging to the First Folio, Richard III closes a tetralogy and charts the ambitions of historical figure King Richard III of England (1452-1485). As part of … Continue reading Shakespearean Drama: Analysis of William Shakespeare’s Richard III, Act I Scene 2

The Elizabethan Country House And The Cult Of Sovereignty

From 1570 – 1620 one can chart the ‘Elizabethan building boom’[1]. Here, we see an unprecedented rise in the building of ‘proud, ambitious heaps’[2] and the beginnings of the ‘architect’ as an entity in the cultural, economic and social landscape. Architectural historian Sir John Summerson credits ‘the most daring of all English buildings’[3] as the … Continue reading The Elizabethan Country House And The Cult Of Sovereignty

Romanticism: Women and Sexuality in ‘Kubla Khan’ by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) writes Kubla Khan (1816) in a mode of escapism which was compatible with the Romantic attitude in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Kubla Khan is composed with allusions to the exotic, foreign and erotic, all which are elements of the poem’s pervading Orientalism. Drawing on connotations of “Otherness”, the … Continue reading Romanticism: Women and Sexuality in ‘Kubla Khan’ by Samuel Taylor Coleridge