Romanticism: Women and Sexuality in ‘Christabel’ by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) frames Christabel (1816) within Gothicism, extending on the occult forces of the “Other” embodied by women. Coleridge had written on the presentation of female characters in Gothic literature stating that they were either models of ‘trembling innocence’ or of ‘shameless harlotry’[1]. This statement correlates with a view within the sphere of … Continue reading Romanticism: Women and Sexuality in ‘Christabel’ by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

‘Good’ and ‘Bad’ Women in Medieval Art

Reinforcing the lockdown on women’s sexuality and the expectations surrounding her position is made explicit in their representation in late-medieval art through the frequent juxtaposition of those seen to be as vessels of virtue or vice. Popular divisions were made between good and evil, of life and death and between body and soul: where women … Continue reading ‘Good’ and ‘Bad’ Women in Medieval Art

L’Amour Courtois: Courtly Love – Women in Medieval Art

Courtly love or l'amour courtois as the french called this poetic movement appears in Western European literary and artistic traditions between the 12th and 15th centuries. Beginning with the troubadour poetry of Aquitaine and Provence, a chivalric code of conduct was prescribed, between ladies and the men who vowed to serve them in a romanticised idyll. Stefan … Continue reading L’Amour Courtois: Courtly Love – Women in Medieval Art

Women in Late-Medieval Art: The Image of Eve

The perceptions of women from their representation in late-medieval art (1300 - 1500) suggest identities, carefully crafted and delivered by those governing society. The church and patriarchy held it's domination, meaning that a woman's place was inherently subordinate and defined by the characteristics of her sexuality. These suppositions were imposed on those whose views were … Continue reading Women in Late-Medieval Art: The Image of Eve