Thoughts On The Women Who Inspired London Art by Lucy Merello Peterson for fellow historians and readers

The early-mid century London art scene has always been of particular interest to me, given my love affair with the Bloomsbury Group and their circle as they fox-trotted across the literary, artistic, philosophical and intellectual worlds of the new millennia. The Omega Set, in particular and their liberal play with the decorative arts was especially … Continue reading Thoughts On The Women Who Inspired London Art by Lucy Merello Peterson for fellow historians and readers

Let down your hair: The Comb as a Love Token in Medieval and Renaissance Europe

The image of a beautiful young woman combing her long, oftentimes blonde hair, has traction throughout the Medieval period and in folklore and fairytale ever since. Indeed, it’s a single strand of Isolde’s hair, the Goose Girl’s unbraiding, the Virgin Queen’s coronation splendor, Rapunzel’s tresses – that capture the imagination and are truly evocative of … Continue reading Let down your hair: The Comb as a Love Token in Medieval and Renaissance Europe

Dadaism & Surrealism: Responses to Culture

Dada and Surrealism respond to cultural circumstances, into which their respective aesthetic and ideological frameworks come into play. The dadaist response post-WWI is overtly politicised in Berlin, where the aftermath of war in Germany was felt acutely, providing a state of social and political disorder which German artists could exploit through the dada channel. Dada, … Continue reading Dadaism & Surrealism: Responses to Culture

Thoughts on Lady of the House by Charlotte Furness for fellow readers and historians

Studying the Country House for my masters, of course I wanted to get my hands on Lady of the House: Elite 19th Century Women and their role in the English Country House by Charlotte Furness. How women are intimately bound up with the decorative arts, social history and material culture has been a constant source of … Continue reading Thoughts on Lady of the House by Charlotte Furness for fellow readers and historians