Prince Albert: Patron & Collector – Supporting the Efforts of Artists and Innovators

Prince Albert proved himself to be an involved patron using his own expertise to foster artistic talent, his twin pursuits of Northern and Italian painting inclined the prince to encourage living artists. For example, Albert acquired paintings from contemporaries such as William Dobson, William Dyce, Charles Eastlake and Michael Wittmer1, whose work added to the vocabulary … Continue reading Prince Albert: Patron & Collector – Supporting the Efforts of Artists and Innovators

The Omega Workshops Ltd. – Objects and Interiors

In the introductory article, we went over the principles on which the Omega Workshops Ltd. were founded. I feel that the best way to trace development in the decorative arts is to explore how forming principles were practically applied. To that end, we’re going to use Bloomsbury and Omega styled interiors and objects as a … Continue reading The Omega Workshops Ltd. – Objects and Interiors

The Impressionists – Capturing 19th Century Paris By Day and By Night

The work commissioned by Napoléon III formed the basis of modernity under an extensive series of ‘Second Empire reforms’ during the years 1853-18701. Chief Urban Planner, Baron Hausmann’s planned redevelopment of Paris (quite literally) opened the avenues expected of a modern metropolis: sprawling boulevards, public spaces and monuments invited polite society to engage in leisure … Continue reading The Impressionists – Capturing 19th Century Paris By Day and By Night

Prince Albert: Patron & Collector – Taste, Influence and Personal Preference

In 19th century England the fact remained that Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, consort to Queen Victoria, was a ‘foreign’ German prince1. Parliament had been cautious, reigning in Prince Albert’s allowance of Royal privileges, one of which included holding back the title ‘Prince Consort’ and another saw the strings to the royal purse being … Continue reading Prince Albert: Patron & Collector – Taste, Influence and Personal Preference

The Omega Workshops Ltd. – The Big Idea

Perhaps you saw the televised adaption Life in Squares or perhaps you encountered one of its members through the literary and artistic channels of early 20th century Bohemianism: The infamous Bloomsbury Group were a collective of artists, philosophers, writers and intellectuals active at the exciting time of early British Modernism (by which I refer to … Continue reading The Omega Workshops Ltd. – The Big Idea

Musings: The Concept of “Femininity” and the Rococo Style

With the rococo, given the social climate contemporary to that time in history, you cannot help but notice that the scenes and embellishments demonstrate the nuances of taste, decoration and aesthetic influenced and informed by women. It was the Earl of Shaftesbury who, in, 1713 denounced the Rococo style as “a revolting form exalting Sensation … Continue reading Musings: The Concept of “Femininity” and the Rococo Style

Displaying Porcelain in the 17th and 18th Centuries

The porcelain displays of William and Mary were prevalent on a lesser scale (in terms of grandeur, moving on from the baroque palace) in the Dutch interior of the 17th century where Chinese pieces were a desirable luxury and a popular commodity among the affluent [1]. Here, choice examples of an eclectic variety (vases, bowls, … Continue reading Displaying Porcelain in the 17th and 18th Centuries

‘Good’ and ‘Bad’ Women in Medieval Art

Reinforcing the lockdown on women’s sexuality and the expectations surrounding her position is made explicit in their representation in late-medieval art through the frequent juxtaposition of those seen to be as vessels of virtue or vice. Popular divisions were made between good and evil, of life and death and between body and soul: where women … Continue reading ‘Good’ and ‘Bad’ Women in Medieval Art

Decoration in the 18th Century: A Companion to West Wycombe

1740-1800 Fig. 1: Louis Jean Deprez, The Herculaneum Gate at Pompeii, undated, black ink, grey wash and watercolour, National Museum, Stockholm. Outfitting a country house in the 18th century was as much a consideration of its function as with anything else, which, naturally, would reflect the tastes and pursuits of its owner along with their … Continue reading Decoration in the 18th Century: A Companion to West Wycombe